Friends after play first

Added: Rhesa Tone - Date: 09.05.2022 04:00 - Views: 42822 - Clicks: 934

Approximately 1. In the UK, and in many other countries across the world, it has been six weeks or longer since children last played, in person, with a friend. When lockdown is lifted, children should be allowed to play with their friends as soon as possible. In the meantime, technology provides some ways for children to connect with their peers.

For social and emotional wellbeing, children need to have the opportunity for all types of playincluding play with other children. This peer play is crucially important for children of all ages. Peer relationships are unique because they are voluntary, equal, and require negotiation and compromise. Play with peers allows children to learn to regulate their emotions, develop social skills and form a sense of identity. Without the opportunity to play closely with their friends, children can feel lonely and socially isolated.

Children who find social situations, school and separating from their parents difficult may be coping relatively well with lockdown, because they do not need to face the situations they find challenging. However, exposure to feared situations is a critical Friends after play first of overcoming anxiety and fear. This extended period without any exposure may lead to increased fears in these children and make the transition out of lockdown very challenging. These rates were even higher for parents of children with special educational needs.

Friends after play first

The loosening of lockdown should be done in a way that allows children to play with their peers as soon as possible playfirst. Where necessary, individual plans for transitioning children back to school should be developed in partnership with families. It is likely that parents and children will have some anxiety about how safe it is for children to interact with one another. Until lockdown is lifted, parents can help their children maintain playful social contact with their peers via technology.

This does not provide all of the benefits of face-to-face social interaction but, while lockdown continues, it can help children remain socially connected.

Friends after play first

Instead, what is important is what children are doing on their screens. If they are using them to engage with and play with friends, the benefits right now are likely to outweigh any risks. Older children may enjoy video-calling and chatting with friends, while other children may prefer to play games online with friends. Where possible, maintaining some of the structure of their peer groups through group calls or games is likely to be helpful for helping them to maintain their sense of identity as part of the group.

Social media can help maintain friendships and provide feelings of connectedness. For younger children, using technology to maintain contact with friends will be more challenging. For these children, free-play opportunities at home as well as play with parents and siblings will be important for supporting social and emotional wellbeing.

Friends after play first

This can feel like an added pressure on parents alongside homeschooling and work, but there are good reasons for prioritising play. There is excellent advice available to support parents to play with their children. At the moment, technology is a lifeline for children and young people.

Friends after play first

But it is essential that, as soon as they are allowed to, children and young people are encouraged back outdoors and back to face-to-face interaction without social distancing to best support their mental and physical health. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons .

Friends after play first

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Friends after play first

You can find out more about our cookie policy. By continuing to use our site you accept these terms, and are happy for us to use cookies to improve your browsing experience. Schools should encourage play when lockdown is lifted. Image by manseok Kim from Pixabay Equal relationships For social and emotional wellbeing, children need to have the opportunity for all types of playincluding play with other children.

Friends after play first

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Friends after play first

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